Sheila Oflanagan Bibliography Maker

In her first novel to be published in the U.S., O'Flanagan puts her initially stereotypical characters through so much good conversation-both sharp repartee and introspective soul searching-that they come to life. When we meet the Driscoll sisters of Dublin, Nessa, the responsible eldest, is a smug, nesting wife and mother; Cate, the perfectionist in the middle, is struggling with commitment to a man she doesn't trust; and Bree, the motorcycle-riding youngest, is wondering why she's never had a relationship that lasted more than three months. It isn't long before Nessa is unsettled by a rumor that her husband is having an affair, the newly and unsteadily coupled Bree is offering to run surveillance on him, and Cate's leavening the mix by proposing to her boyfriend. The sisters are always bickering (particularly bitterly when one sister considers an abortion), but there is no question that they'll stick together in the end. There is, however, some genuine suspense about which of their husbands and boyfriends will survive the denouement, and which, in the title phrase, "has got to go"-this in part because the male characters aren't as fully fleshed out as the female. Overall, O'Flanagan manages to keep wisdom and humor at the forefront and tosses in nice touches like chapter heads keyed into Nessa's interest in astrology-"Moon/Pluto Aspects: Changeable, Prone to Emotional Outbursts."
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Sheila O'Flanagan

Goodreads Author


Born

Dublin, Ireland

Website

http://sheilaoflanagan.com/


Twitter

sheilaoflanagan


Genre

Contemporary, Chick Lit, Romance


Member Since

March 2014


URL

https://www.goodreads.com/sheilaoflanagan


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As you can see, a Dubliner all my life. My parents owned a grocery shop in the Iveagh Markets, in the Liberties area of the city and I guess city blood runs through my veins.

As a child I enjoyed reading and telling stories and everyone thought that I end up in a job which had something to do with books and literature. But though I applied for a job in the library all of the job offers I got were in commerce.

I turned down lots of them before my mother accepted one for me (I was on holiday at the time). It was in the Central Bank of Ireland and that’s how my career in financial services began.

I started out in administration and then moved jobs until finally I was working as a dealer in a commercial bank. Eventually I was promoted to Chief DeaAs you can see, a Dubliner all my life. My parents owned a grocery shop in the Iveagh Markets, in the Liberties area of the city and I guess city blood runs through my veins.

As a child I enjoyed reading and telling stories and everyone thought that I end up in a job which had something to do with books and literature. But though I applied for a job in the library all of the job offers I got were in commerce.

I turned down lots of them before my mother accepted one for me (I was on holiday at the time). It was in the Central Bank of Ireland and that’s how my career in financial services began.

I started out in administration and then moved jobs until finally I was working as a dealer in a commercial bank. Eventually I was promoted to Chief Dealer (the first female CD in the country). I traded lots of different things – foreign exchange, swaps, options, bonds…all of the kind of things you read about in the papers and that sound very technical and difficult. Of course once you’re doing it, it’s not half as technical as it sounds.

But I still loved reading and writing (which I did in my spare time) and I desperately wanted to write my own book. I guess I never quite got over the fact that I was never offered the library job! In my thirties I decided that it was now or never and I sat down, stuck Chapter 1 on a page, and started. I wrote the whole thing before sending it off.

I was offered a publishing deal (with no advance) by an Irish company but only if I wrote a different book! So back to the drawing board, I started again. It was another two years before it was published. It wasn’t until I’d written a few books and was offered a contract (this time with an advance!) from another publisher that I felt able to give up my trading job and write full time. So, even though it took a long time, I eventually realised my dream of being a full-time writer.

And now I also write a business column for the Irish Times.

When I’m writing a book I want to do three things:

* Tell a good story
* Make the reader feel like they know the characters
* Make each book better than the last

I don’t write for any particular audience but I suppose I must have people like me in mind – people who have busy lives and who like to escape into someone else’s for a while.

I love writing books. I hope you enjoy reading them....more


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